Course Course Information Instructor
COGS 1
Introduction to Cognitive Sci
TR 08:00-09:20 in CENTR 101  
Description: A team taught course highlighting development of the field and the broad range of topics covered in the major. Example topics include addiction, analogy, animal cognition, human-computer interaction, language, neuroimaging, neural networks, reasoning, robots, and real-world applications.
COGS 3
An Introduction to Computing
MWF 09:00-09:50 in WLH 2204  
Description: A practical introduction to computers. Designed for undergraduates in the social sciences. Topics include: basic operations of personal computers (MAC, PC), UNIX, word processing, e-mail, spreadsheets, and creating web pages using the World Wide Web. No previous background in computing required.
COGS 8
Hands-On Computing
TR 15:30-16:50 in CSB 115  
Description: Introductory-level course that will give students insight into the fundamental concepts of algorithmic thinking and design. The course will provide the students with first-person, hands-on experience programming a web crawler and simple physical robots.
COGS 9
Introduction to Data Science
MWF 14:00-14:50 in WLH 2112 (website)  
Description: Concepts of data and its role in science will be introduced, as well as the ideas behind data-mining, text-mining, machine learning, and graph theory and how scientists and companies are leveraging those methods to uncover new insights into human cognition.
COGS 11
Minds & Brains
MWF 11:00-11:50 in HSS 1330  
Description: How damaged and normal brains influence the way humans solve problems, remember or forget, pay attention to things; how they affect our emotions, and the way we use language in daily life.
COGS 12
Language, Culture & Cognition
MWF 11:00-11:50 in HSS 1128A  
COGS 14B
Intro. to Statistical Analysis
TR 11:00-12:20 in SOLIS 104  
COGS 17
Neurobiology of Cognition
TR 14:00-15:20 in CENTR 105  
Description: Introduction to the organization and functions of the nervous system. Topics include molecular, cellular, developmental, systems, and behavioral neurobiology. Specifically, structure and function of neurons, peripheral and central nervous systems, sensory, motor, and control systems, learning and memory mechanisms. (Students may not receive credit for both Biology 12 and Cognitive Science 17. This course fulfills general-education requirements for Marshall and Roosevelt Colleges as well as Warren by petition.)
COGS 87
Freshman Seminar: Minds Making Religion
W 14:00-14:50 in APM 2301  
Description: The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen.
COGS 101A
Sensation and Perception
MWF 15:00-15:50 in PETER 110  
Description: An introduction to the experimental study of cognition with a focus on sensation and perception. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 1.
COGS 102A
Distributed Cognition
TR 12:30-13:50 in LEDDN AUD  
Description: Cognitive processes extend beyond the boundaries of the person to include the environment, artifacts, social interactions, and culture. Major themes include the philosophy and history of cognitive science, the role of artifacts in human cognition, and theories of socially-distributed, embodied, and extended cognition. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 1 and Cognitive Science 14.
COGS 107A
Neuroanatomy and Physiology
TR 09:30-10:50 in CENTR 101  
COGS 109
Modeling & Data Analysis
MWF 17:00-17:50 in CENTR 105  
Description: Exposure to the basic computational methods useful throughout cognitive science. Computing basic statistics, modeling learning individuals, evolving populations, communicating agents, and corpus-based linguistics will be considered. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 18 or equivalent programming course or consent of instructor.
COGS 115
Neurologcl Devlp & Cogntv Chng
 
COGS 118A
Natural Computation I
 
Description: This course is an introduction to computational modeling of biological intelligence, focusing on neural networks and related approaches to supervised learning. Topics include estimation, filtering, optimization, multilayer perceptrons, support vector machines, boosting, Bayes nets. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 109, Mathematics 20E, Mathematics 20F, and Mathematics 180A or consent of instructor.
COGS 118B
Natural Computation II
TR 12:30-13:50 in SSB 106  
Description: This course is an introduction to computational modeling of biological intelligence, focusing on neural networks and related approaches to unsupervised learning. Topics include density estimation, clustering, self-organizing maps, principal component analysis, information theoretic models, and evolutionary approaches. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 109, Mathematics 20E, Mathematics 20F, and Mathematics 180A or consent of instructor.
COGS 119
Programming/Experimental Res.
TR 17:00-18:20 in CSB 115 (website)  
Description: Students learn how to use Matlab for experimental research in cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology, linguistics… Topics include stimulus presentation, response collection, analyzing and displaying data. Programming is an applied skill; like playing an instrument or a sport, it needs to be practiced. COGS119 provides information, support, motivation, structure, and "coaching”. Students acquire skills they can apply at school and beyond, and feel more confident in their programming and research abilities. The code developed in class can be adapted for future projects (e.g., honors program). Matlab is used in many settings and these skills make students more competitive for graduate school, fellowships, internships, academic and industry jobs.
COGS 143
Animal Cognition
TR 11:00-12:20 in MANDE B-150  
Description: Review of historical perspectives: introspectionist, behaviorist, and cognitivist models. Examination of how perceptual and motor constraints and ecological demands yield species-specific differences in cognitive repertoire. Contemporary issues in the comparative study of the evolution of human cognition. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
COGS 151
Analogy and Conceptual Systems
TR 09:30-10:50 in SEQUO 148  
COGS 156
Language Development
TR 15:30-16:50 in CENTR 214  
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Cognitive Ethnomusicology
MWF 13:00-13:50 in PCYNH 120  
Description: Music is ubiquitously present in human culture. As much as it is ubiquitous, music is diverse in both form and usage. From sacred ritual to war, music is a component of many human activities. Free from the semantic necessities of language, music is constrained only by the aesthetics of those making it. Ethnomusicology seeks to understand music in its cultural context--how and why people make the specific types of music they do. Cognitive ethnomusicology takes a broad approach to the study of musical culture, perception, and processing. The course will explore fundamental components of musical behavior, such as synchronized rhythm or the use of visual symbols to enhance recall of musical ideas, while also exploring specific genres or styles of music that have unique characteristics, such as the timbre-melodies of Tuvan vocal music or the complex rhythmic patterns of Carnatic Mrdangam playing.
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Social-Cognitive Development
 
Description: Special topics in cognitive science are discussed. (May be repeated when topics vary.) Prerequisites: department approval.
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Interaction Design Research
(website)  
Description: Prepares students to conduct original HCI research by reading and discussing seminal and cutting-edge research papers. Topics include design, social software, input techniques, mobile, and ubiquitous computing. Student pairs perform a quarter-long mini research project that leverages campus research efforts. TuTh 3:30pm-4:50pm in CSE 2154. Prerequisites: (Cogs14a or CSE20) and (an A- or higher in Cogs120 or Cogs102C). Please contact Thanh Maxwell at tmaxwell@ucsd.edu for departmental approval.
COGS 171
Mirror Neuron System
TR 15:30-16:50 in CSB 004  
COGS 174
Drugs: Brain, Mind and Culture
TR 12:30-13:50 in SOLIS 104  
Description: This course explores how drugs interact with the brain/mind and culture. It covers evolutionary and historical perspectives, brain chemistry, pharmacology, expectancies and placebo effects, and models of addiction. It also provides a biopsychosocial survey of commonly used and abused substances. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
COGS 187A
Usability & Info. Architecture
TR 12:30-13:50 in CENTR 222  
Description: Examines the cognitive basis of successful web and multimedia design. Topics: information architecture, navigation, usability, graphic layout, transaction design, and how to understand user interaction. Prerequisites: CSE 7; upper-division standing.
COGS 187A
Usability & Info. Architecture
TR 09:30-10:50 in WLH 2207  
Description: Examines the cognitive basis of successful web and multimedia design. Topics: information architecture, navigation, usability, graphic layout, transaction design, and how to understand user interaction. Prerequisites: CSE 7; upper-division standing.
COGS 200
Cognitive Science Seminar
F 15:00-16:50 in CSB 003  
Description: This seminar emphasizes the conceptual basis of cognitive science, including representation, processing mechanisms, language, and the role of interaction among individuals, culture, and the environment. Current developments in each field are considered as they relate to issues in cognitive science. (May be repeated for credit.)
COGS 203
Foundation:Theor&Meth in Studi
MW 10:00-11:20 in CSB 272  
Description: Surveys a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of human cognition. Topics include language structure, language processing, concepts and categories, knowledge representation, analogy and metaphor, reasoning, planning and action, problem solving, learning and expertise, and emotion.
COGS 211A
Research Methods/Cogn Science
 
COGS 219
Prog. for Behavioral Sci.
(website)  
Description: Students learn how to use Matlab and the Psychophysics toolbox for experimental research in cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology, linguistics and related fields… Topics include stimulus presentation, response collection, analyzing and displaying data. Programming is an applied skill; like playing an instrument or a sport, it needs to be practiced. COGS219 provides information, support, motivation, structure, and "coaching”. Students acquire skills they can apply at graduate school and beyond, feel more confident in their programming and research abilities, and develop code that can be adapted for research projects. For cognitive science students, 219 counts as a methods course; with professor approval, it can count as behavioral or computational issues course.
COGS 229
Design at Large
W 16:00-17:15  
COGS 230
Human-Computer Interaction
 
COGS 230
Human-Computer Interaction
TR 15:30-16:50 in EBU3B 4140  
COGS 238
Topics/Cognitive Linguistics
W 14:00-16:50 in CSB 272  
Description: (Same as Linguistics 238) Basic concepts, empirical findings, and recent developments in cognitive and functional linguistics. Language viewed dynamically in relation to conceptualization, discourse, meaning construction, and cognitive processing. (As topics vary, may be repeated for credit.)
COGS 260
Seminar on Special Topics
 
Description: Specific topics in cognitive science are discussed. (May be repeated when topics vary.)

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