Undergraduate Courses

Course Course Information Instructor
COGS 1
Introduction to Cognitive Sci
TR 15:30-16:50 in PETER 110 (website)  
Description: A team taught course highlighting development of the field and the broad range of topics covered in the major. Example topics include addiction, analogy, animal cognition, human-computer interaction, language, neuroimaging, neural networks, reasoning, robots, and real-world applications.
COGS 3
An Introduction to Computing
MWF 10:00-10:50 in CENTR 113 (website)  
Description: A practical introduction to computers. Designed for undergraduates in the social sciences. Topics include: basic operations of personal computers (MAC, PC), UNIX, word processing, e-mail, spreadsheets, and creating web pages using the World Wide Web. No previous background in computing required.
COGS 11
Minds & Brains
MWF 09:00-09:50 in CENTR 119 (website)  
Description: How damaged and normal brains influence the way humans solve problems, remember or forget, pay attention to things; how they affect our emotions, and the way we use language in daily life.
COGS 14A
Intro. to Research Methods
MWF 15:00-15:50 in CSB 001 (website)  
COGS 14B
Intro. to Statistical Analysis
 
COGS 17
Neurobiology of Cognition
TR 14:00-15:20 in CENTR 216 (website)  
Description: Introduction to the organization and functions of the nervous system. Topics include molecular, cellular, developmental, systems, and behavioral neurobiology. Specifically, structure and function of neurons, peripheral and central nervous systems, sensory, motor, and control systems, learning and memory mechanisms. (Students may not receive credit for both Biology 12 and Cognitive Science 17. This course fulfills general-education requirements for Marshall and Roosevelt Colleges as well as Warren by petition.)
COGS 87
Freshman Seminar: How Humans Read Other Minds
T 13:00-13:50 in CSB 003  
Description: The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen.
COGS 87
Freshman Seminar: Minds making Religion
R 12:00-12:50 in CSB 003  
Description: The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and undergraduate colleges, and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering freshmen.
COGS 91
SCANS Presents
W 15:00-15:50 in CSB 003  
Description: Experiments, data analysis, and methodological developments are essential elements of the scientific enterprise. But so are the underlying *assumptions* — statements taken for granted — on which those elements rest, and that shape scientific understanding. For example, for more than a century neuroscience made the assumption that new neurons are not added to the adult brain, and despite contradictory evidence it persisted for years. Often assumptions are beneficial, but sometimes they are detrimental. They can be obvious and visible, but occasionally they are barely noticeable, implicitly built in to the foundations of scientific theories. What are some of the major assumptions in cognitive science? Are they warranted? Can some of them be challenged? In this seminar we will discuss implicit (and often forgotten) assumptions in the scientific study of the mind.
COGS 101B
Learning, Memory and Attention
TR 14:00-15:20 in PETER 110 (website)  
Description: A survey of the experimental study of learning, memory, and attention. Topics include conditioning, automaticity, divided attention, memory systems, and the nature of mental representation. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 1. Recommended: Cognitive Science 101A.
COGS 102B
Cognitive Ethnography
TR 12:30-13:50 in PETER 108 (website)  
Description: This course examines memory, reasoning, language understanding, learning, and planning directly in everyday, real-world settings. The course work includes projects in which students make observations of real-world activity and analyze their cognitive significance. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 102A.
COGS 107B
Systems Neuroscience
TR 09:30-10:50 in PETER 108 (website)  
COGS 118B
Natural Computation II
TR 11:00-12:20 in WLH 2208  
Description: This course is an introduction to computational modeling of biological intelligence, focusing on neural networks and related approaches to unsupervised learning. Topics include density estimation, clustering, self-organizing maps, principal component analysis, information theoretic models, and evolutionary approaches. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 109, Mathematics 20E, Mathematics 20F, and Mathematics 180A or consent of instructor.
COGS 143
Animal Cognition
TR 15:30-16:50 in CSB 005  
Description: Review of historical perspectives: introspectionist, behaviorist, and cognitivist models. Examination of how perceptual and motor constraints and ecological demands yield species-specific differences in cognitive repertoire. Contemporary issues in the comparative study of the evolution of human cognition. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
COGS 151
Analogy and Conceptual Systems
TR 14:00-15:20 in CENTR 217B  
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Genes, Brains & Behavior
TR 11:00-12:20 in PCYNH 120 (website)  
Description: The topics of this course are: twin studies of behavior and brain, genome wide association studies, genetic regulation of behavior and brain development, polygenic models of complex traits, modeling experience effects… There will be weekly readings and guest lecturers, many of whom will be the authors of the papers. Discussion will follow the lectures. There will be a midterm and final.
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Brain Computer Interaction
F 13:00-15:50 in CSB 280  
Description: This course will discuss signal processing, pattern recognition algorithms, and human-computer interaction issues in EEG-based brain-computer interfaces. A good background in math and some familiarity with machine learning (e.g. COGS 109 or ideally 118A or 118B or equivalent) is required.
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Neurobiology of Motivation
MWF 14:00-14:50 in CSB 272 (website)  
Description: Special topics in cognitive science are discussed. (May be repeated when topics vary.) Prerequisites: department approval.
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Lang Devlpmnt/Early Childhood
 
Description: Special topics in cognitive science are discussed. (May be repeated when topics vary.) Prerequisites: department approval.
COGS 160
Seminar on Special Topics: Experimental Language Research
 
Description: Special topics in cognitive science are discussed. (May be repeated when topics vary.) Prerequisites: department approval.
COGS 172
Brain Disorders and Cognition
TR 14:00-15:20 in CSB 004 (website)  
Description: A review of the patterns of impaired and intact cognitive abilities present in brain-damaged patients in terms of damage to one or more components of a model of normal cognitive functioning. (Cognitive science majors may not receive elective credit for both Psychology 139 and Cognitive Science 172.) Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 107A.
COGS 174
Drugs: Brain, Mind and Culture
MWF 13:00-13:50 in SOLIS 104 (website)  
Description: This course explores how drugs interact with the brain/mind and culture. It covers evolutionary and historical perspectives, brain chemistry, pharmacology, expectancies and placebo effects, and models of addiction. It also provides a biopsychosocial survey of commonly used and abused substances. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
COGS 177
Space and Time in the Brain
MWF 11:00-11:50 in CSB 001 (website)  
COGS 187A
Usability & Info. Architecture
 
Description: Examines the cognitive basis of successful web and multimedia design. Topics: information architecture, navigation, usability, graphic layout, transaction design, and how to understand user interaction. Prerequisites: CSE 7; upper-division standing.
COGS 187A
Usability & Info. Architecture
MWF 16:00-16:50 in HSS 1330  
Description: Examines the cognitive basis of successful web and multimedia design. Topics: information architecture, navigation, usability, graphic layout, transaction design, and how to understand user interaction. Prerequisites: CSE 7; upper-division standing.

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