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Metaphors for grad school

The broad nature of Cognitive Science means that the research in our department is incredibly diverse. (more)



Wang B., Mezlini A. M., Demir F., Fiume M., Tu Z., Brudno M., Haibe-Kains B., Goldenberg A. (2014). Similarity Network Fusion for Aggregating Data Types on a Genomic Scale. Nature Methods, Jan. 26.
recent technologies have made it cost-effective to collect diverse types of genome-wide data. computational methods are needed to combine these data to create a comprehensive view of a given disease or a biological process. similarity network fusion (snF) solves this problem by constructing networks of samples (e.g., patients) for each available data type and then efficiently fusing these into one network that represents the full spectrum of underlying data. For example, to create a comprehensive view of a disease given a cohort of patients, snF computes and fuses patient similarity networks obtained from each of their data types separately, taking advantage of the complementarity in the data. We used snF to combine mrnA expression, dnA methylation and micrornA (mirnA) expression data for five cancer data sets. snF substantially outperforms single data type analysis and established integrative approaches when identifying cancer subtypes and is effective for predicting survival.

Featured Classes
Fall 2014:
  • COGS9: Introduction to Data Science
    Concepts of data and its role in science will be introduced, as well as the ideas behind data-mining, text-mining, machine learning, and graph theory and how scientists and companies are leveraging those methods to uncover new insights into human cognition.
  • COGS160: Cognitive Ethnomusicology
    Music is ubiquitously present in human culture. As much as it is ubiquitous, music is diverse in both form and usage. From sacred ritual to war, music is a component of many human activities. Free from the semantic necessities of language, music is constrained only by the aesthetics of those making it. Ethnomusicology seeks to understand music in its cultural context--how and why people make the specific types of music they do. Cognitive ethnomusicology takes a broad approach to the study of musical culture, perception, and processing. The course will explore fundamental components of musical behavior, such as synchronized rhythm or the use of visual symbols to enhance recall of musical ideas, while also exploring specific genres or styles of music that have unique characteristics, such as the timbre-melodies of Tuvan vocal music or the complex rhythmic patterns of Carnatic Mrdangam playing.
  • COGS160: Interaction Design Research
    Prepares students to conduct original HCI research by reading and discussing seminal and cutting-edge research papers. Topics include design, social software, input techniques, mobile, and ubiquitous computing. Student pairs perform a quarter-long mini research project that leverages campus research efforts. TuTh 3:30pm-4:50pm in CSE 2154. Prerequisites: (Cogs14a or CSE20) and (an A- or higher in Cogs120 or Cogs102C). Please contact Thanh Maxwell at tmaxwell@ucsd.edu for departmental approval.

Research Opportunities (199s)
  • Sound Recognition in Language
    The Language Acquisition & Sound Research lab is seeking enthusiastic, motivated, and reliable undergraduate research assistants to assist with a study. The study investigates how different people interpret sounds when processing language. Successful applicants will receive course credit and gain valuable experience with language research! Interested students should contact Prof. ...
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  • Language Development and Remediation in Children
    We are evaluating two interventions for dyslexia that involve training the temporal dynamics of the visual system (magnocellular pathway) and the auditory system, and whether the two interventions together have super-additive effects. As a Research Assistant, you would be traveling to one or two of five participating local elementary schools ...
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Recent News & Links (see all)

Department Events (see all)

Matt Schalles (CogSci PhD defense)

Tue, Aug 5th, 1:00pm-2:00pm (CSB 180)
(1 week, 5 days from now)


Campus-wide Events (see all)

Walter Lasecki (Design Lab talk)

Crowd-Powered Interactive Systems

I create and deploy interactive systems that use a combination of human and machine intelligence to operate robustly in real-world settings. Unlike prior work in human computation, our "Crowd Agent" model allows crowds of people to support real-time interactive systems. For example, Scribe allows non-experts to caption speech in real-time for deaf and hard of hearing users, where prior approaches were either not accurate enough, or required professionals with years of training; Chorus allows multi-session conversations ...
(click for details)

Thu, Jul 24th, 12:00pm-1:00pm (1601 Atkinson Hall)
(3 hours, 40 minutes from now)


Herbert Jaeger (TDLC talk)

Controlling Recurrent Neural Networks by Conceptors
(click for details)

Mon, Jul 28th, 12:00pm-1:00pm (CSE building, room 1202)
(4 days, 3 hours from now)