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Cognitive science intramural basketball: A tale of fighting against the odds

A tale of a cognitive scientist fighting the good fight--here, on the court, rather than in the lab. (more)



Wang B., Mezlini A. M., Demir F., Fiume M., Tu Z., Brudno M., Haibe-Kains B., Goldenberg A. (2014). Similarity Network Fusion for Aggregating Data Types on a Genomic Scale. Nature Methods, Jan. 26.
recent technologies have made it cost-effective to collect diverse types of genome-wide data. computational methods are needed to combine these data to create a comprehensive view of a given disease or a biological process. similarity network fusion (snF) solves this problem by constructing networks of samples (e.g., patients) for each available data type and then efficiently fusing these into one network that represents the full spectrum of underlying data. For example, to create a comprehensive view of a disease given a cohort of patients, snF computes and fuses patient similarity networks obtained from each of their data types separately, taking advantage of the complementarity in the data. We used snF to combine mrnA expression, dnA methylation and micrornA (mirnA) expression data for five cancer data sets. snF substantially outperforms single data type analysis and established integrative approaches when identifying cancer subtypes and is effective for predicting survival.
Bregman, M. R., & Creel, S. C. (2014). Gradient language dominance affects talker learning. Cognition, 130(1), 85–95. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2013.09.010
Traditional conceptions of spoken language assume that speech recognition and talker identification are computed separately. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies imply some separation between the two faculties, but recent perceptual studies suggest better talker recognition in familiar languages than unfamiliar languages. A familiar-language benefit in talker recognition potentially implies strong ties between the two domains. However, little is known about the nature of this language familiarity effect. The current study investigated the relationship between speech and talker processing by assessing bilingual and monolingual listeners’ ability to learn voices as a function of language familiarity and age of acquisition. Two effects emerged. First, bilinguals learned to recognize talkers in their first language (Korean) more rapidly than they learned to recognize talkers in their second language (English), while English-speaking participants showed the opposite pattern (learning English talkers faster than Korean talkers). Second, bilinguals’ learning rate for talkers in their second language (English) correlated with age of English acquisition. Taken together, these results suggest that language background materially affects talker encoding, implying a tight relationship between speech and talker representations.

Featured Classes
Spring 2015:
  • COGS160: Language Research: A Practicum
    This course involves working about 10 hours per week in Dr. Coulson's lab on language research projects and writing a paper on the findings of one of them. The class meets weekly to talk about the motivation for the projects, to discuss how different language research techniques are used, and how to analyze and interpret data. For more information to contact Dr. Coulson [coulson@cogsci.ucsd.edu] directly.
  • COGS160: Communication in Infancy
    COGS 160 is a mixed Practicum/Seminar course designed to provide hands-on experience in research on infancy and early childhood. Students learn skills and are assigned responsibilities based on the project to which they are assigned. Students also participate in a journal club and prepare brief end-of-quarter presentations and reports. It is a 3-quarter sequence. Content, skills, and responsibilities evolve and expand every quarter. Pre-req: upper-division coursework in Cognitive Science, Human Development, Linguistics, and/or Psychology, covering content including one or more cognition or cognitive development cognitive ethnography, neuroscience, psycholinguistics; GPA of 3.3 or better; Commitment to a 3-quarter, 4-credit sequence; Permission of instructor based on interview and availability.

Research Opportunities (199s)
  • Cognitive Processes
    “Raednig thees wrods semes to be esaeir tahn you mgiht hvae tohuhgt; waht colud epxlian tihs?” Could you read the sentence above? Having any trouble understanding or recognizing these words? How possible it could be to understand such a sentence, with/without recognize words? What could you explain your effortless ability ...
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  • Language Development and Remediation in Children
    We are evaluating two interventions for dyslexia that involve training the temporal dynamics of the visual system (magnocellular pathway) and the auditory system, and whether the two interventions together have super-additive effects. As a Research Assistant, you would be traveling to one or two of five participating local elementary schools ...
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  • Connecting the Disconnected with KA Lite
    Lab: Foundation for Learning Equality @ Calit2 Can information technology radically change the way we learn? Who can gain the most from free, open access to resources? At the Foundation for Learning Equality, a non-profit based at Calit2, we are harnessing the power of technology for education to take it ...
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  • Speech Production Adaptation to Individual Speakers
    When speaking to another person, we tailor our speech production based on information we know about that person: for example, you probably don't use the same vocabulary with a professor as you do with a 2-year-old. This project will investigate how specific this adaptation in the speech production system is. ...
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Cog Sci Faculty member receives Lifetime Research Award

Congratulations to Professor Jim Hollan, this year's distinguished recipient of the CHI Lifetime Research Award